Somewhere Between Earth and Sky, There’s Sculpure

by: Kate Messinger

October 9, 2012

Anish Kapoor Lisson Gallery London

Anish Kapoor‘s work is big, even when it’s not. The Indian born sculptor is known for taking up space, and creating space we never expected to find. With infamous work like the mirroring Cloud Gate in Chicago, a backdrop to Lolapalooza, or the epic ArcelorMittal Orbit, a twisting, rollercoaster type observation tower in Olympic Park, London, Kapoor’s work is a toe over the line of falling into space or being sucked up by it.

From October 10th-November 10th Kapoor will be displaying a new contradiction of space in sculpture using varied formats and sizes in his major solo exhibition at the Lisson Gallery at Bell Street in London.

Anish Kapoor Lisson Gallery London

Kapoor’s new work use earth’s textures, like coral, stone, pigment and minerals as a medium, bringing a grounded other-worldliness in comparison to the sleek metals and mirror of his other work.  However the pieces still evoke a feeling of a loss of space or being lost in space, with large rock fixtures  resembling moon craters and dark fiberglass domes like visions into black holes. Some of the sculptures still characteristically loom outside in the sculpture garden, but most take up the many rooms of the gallery, a maze of foreign but connected objects to be peered at from above on table surfaces or floor or witnessed in a fully transformed room meant to cause the viewer unease.

Experiencing Kapoor’s work is not easy; it is usually suffocating or overpowering, something both strangely earthly and relateably transcendental that you can’t just glide by. But it’s something you can’t stop looking at, something that makes you want to inch closer and closer until you touch the surface, or fall in. 

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