Readings from the Oblique Archive

Last Saturday, as part of Francesca Capone‘s solo show, Oblique Archivecurator Rachel Valinsky and the artist invited ten readers to come and read from the works Capone used throughout the exhibit.  Using a wide array of texts ranging from Gertrude Stein to Augusto de Campos, Yoko Ono to Aram Saroyan, Capone overlaps texts that eventually form an illegible image. As the curator of the exhibition explains in her press release, “repetition as insistence and endurance through the text that displays all of itself but will not let itself be read.” So the works in the show are attractive due to their unintelligibility. The viewer forgets that he is looking at a heap of sentences and instead begins, somewhat unconsciously, to understand the text as an image.

2014-FC-Install-5-web
Installation view: Francesca Capone, Oblique Archive, Peninsula Art Space, Brooklyn, NY, 2014. Courtesy of the artist and Peninsula Art Space, Brooklyn, NY.
Photo: Cameron Blaylock

2014-FC-Install-2-web
Installation view: Francesca Capone, Oblique Archive, Peninsula Art Space, Brooklyn, NY, 2014. Courtesy of the artist and Peninsula Art Space, Brooklyn, NY.
Photo: Cameron Blaylock

2014-FC-Install-4-web
Installation view: Francesca Capone, Oblique Archive, Peninsula Art Space, Brooklyn, NY, 2014. Courtesy of the artist and Peninsula Art Space, Brooklyn, NY.
Photo: Cameron Blaylock


To give legibility a chance, Francesca and Rachel invited a series of poets and visual artists to read from the texts Francesca used:

Augusto de Campos by Matt Longabucco
John Cage by Ian Hatcher
Jenny Holzer by Sarah Gerard
Isidore Isou by Kit Schluter
Lorine Niedecker by Erica Baum
Yoko Ono by Charity Coleman
Aram Saroyan by Juan Antonio Olivares
Leslie Scalapino by Lucy Ives
Gertrude Stein by Trisha Low
Louis Zukofsky by Abraham Adams

Each reader had his or her own take on the text they were assigned, adding to it a little touch of their own sensibilities. This event or exercise in reiteration, if you will, fit perfectly with the idea behind Capone’s work. It is through a process of layering, a process of superimposed renditions of text that we get the final image. So Capone’s work successfully made it through its last layer: the oral.

For more information about the show, visit Peninsula Art Space.

2014-FC-Install-1-web
Installation view: Francesca Capone, Oblique Archive, Peninsula Art Space, Brooklyn, NY, 2014. Courtesy of the artist and Peninsula Art Space, Brooklyn, NY.
Photo: Cameron Blaylock

text by: Michael Valinsky










Don't yet have an account? now!

Order The Radiant Issue Today

Order The Radiant Issue Today

Order The Radiant Issue Today

Order The Radiant Issue Today