Is Pussy Riot getting too big for Putin?

by: Lizzie Plaugic

August 3, 2012


© РИА Новости. Владимир Астапкович. Source- digit.ru

Mother of God, chase Putin out. It’s a phrase now widely-recognized; part of a “punk prayer” by Russian band Pussy Riot, whose name has been on the tip of everyone’s tongue recently—and not for its Pitchfork ratings.

The feminist septet stormed a cathedral in Moscow for an impromptu punk show that landed three members (Yekaterina Samutsevich, Nadezhda Tolokonnikova, and Maria Alyokhina) in jail. That was back in February.

The Pussy Riot trial began this week and so far there are only a few things everyone really knows: The women face up to 7 years in jail, they’ve been denied food and sleep, and have been defended by the Red Hot Chili Peppers’ frontman and mannequin impersonator Anthony Keidis, and musical policeman Sting.

Pussy Riot Girl Band Punk Putin Russia Jail
Source- sm.a-bg.net

And then there are the things no one really knows, like what the outcome of the trial will be, and what it will mean for Russia.

Gawker speculated the government is using the trial to strengthen its alliance with the Orthodox Church. The Guardian said the result of the trial and the treatment of the women will determine Russia’s future image. TIME called the trial the beginning of a new “tyrannical streak” in Putin’s rule. Pussy Riot has offered a public apology, asserting their actions were politically, not religiously, motivated, but the church has refused to accept it.

Putin said on Thursday he didn’t think the band’s punishment should be severe. “I don’t think they should be punished too harshly,” he told reporters in London. “I hope the court issues a correct decision, a well-substantiated one.” So it seems like Putin may be leaning closer to the stadium rock musician point of view than to the Orthodox Church one. Anything’s possible.

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