Female-Led Zines You Need To Know About

In the 90s, the Riot Grrrl movement was the first artist collective to create a female exclusive zine to serve as a platform for women to discuss the pervasive sexism in the punk scene, up and coming music acts, and feminist issues. The pioneering DIY publications like Riot Grrrl Zine, Jigsaw, and Girl Germs showcased the artwork of local artists and the opinions of young revolutionists. Fast-forward to 2015 and conversations about feminism are still occurring, albeit in a different context.  Women still crave that same sense of community. The following are some of our current favorite feminist zines from all over the world. Rather than resorting to online blogs, these ladies are taking the traditional route by creating their own zines that, yes, you can actually hold in your hands. Each illustrates a variety of female perspectives and some awesome art by up and coming artists.

 

Filmme Fatales

Filmme Fatales image 2

Filmme Fatales is a quarterly zine printed in Melbourne, Australia about women in film. Having studied cinema in university, founder, editor and Rookie mag writer Brodie Lancaster found it only natural to dedicate the zine to films, specifically illuminating the “gap in both film writing and feminist writing.” The latest installment of the zine boasts submissions from many talented women such as Rookie founder Tavi Gevinson, Hattie Stewart the self described “professional doodler,” and the color obsessed artist Minna Gilligan.

 

Got a Girl Crush

Got a Girl Crush image

In 2009, online friends Meg from Brooklyn and Andrea from San Francisco started the Got a Girl Crush blog to celebrate the many accomplishments of successful women to empower and inspire other females. The blog proved successful that when the two girls met two years later in real life they decided to bring the online blog to a tangible form. The third issue of the magazine, fully funded by a Kickstarter campaign, displays the talents of L.A.-based illustrator Tuesday Bassen on the cover with a bunch of inspiring interviews of boss ladies inside the magazine.

 

Illuminati Girl Gang

Illuminati Girl Gang

Founded by poet and multimedia artist Gabby BessIlluminati Girl Gang started one day while she was sitting in her room. Upon the realization that male writers are more abundant in literary publications, she created what she wanted to see: a safe space for female artists to freely express themselves. Gabby started with small steps, initiating a webspace for her community and then graduating to a printed publication that has garnered a cult following. The zine serves as a platform for female identified perspectives in art and literature, featuring visceral essays that unveil  a raw and intimate look into the lives of the female writers and poets. Each issue has boasted a roster of talented female writers and artists such as Roxane Gay and Lucy Tiven. Purchase the latest zine right here to support your local girl gang.

 

Golly Magazine

Golly Magazine

Horrified at women’s contemporary magazines, editor-in-chief Roxanne Fequiere and creative director Ally O’Shea sought out to create a “friend with impeccable taste and razor sharp wit.” These kick-ass ladies wanted to put out a women’s magazine that was funnier, smarter, and more diverse than other women’s interest magazines. “I wanted to create something that would be relevant to women we actually know, instead of the idea of a woman that doesn’t even exist,” says former fashion freelance writer and eBay copywriter, Roxanne. Golly magazine accomplishes exactly that with glossy pages full of journalism, photography, and essays on topics like social justice, fashion, and style.

 

text by: Kimberly Larco










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