American Artist Jane Moseley NYC

December 19, 2011


5 YOUNG MINDS

MATTHEW STONE (U.K.)

British artist Matthew Stone at the HOLE GalleryPhoto courtesy of Matthew Stone

Matthew Stone is a multimedia art-as-life artist who in his very being and expression creates his works. Aside from performance, nightlife and fashion excursions, the meat of his physical artworks involves an exploration of body geometry in photography as exploded through sculpture and phenomenology. His work as a photographer, sculptor, performer, curator and writer has been well recognized in London, despite being relatively new to the United States.

For his first solo exhibition in the United States, Stone presents “Optimism as Cultural Rebellion,” an exhibition of sculpture, photography and performance that will include human and formal geometries alongside hypnotic electro-acoustic music, dance and opera. In the intersection of media, Stone’s vision of the future of human connection in a digital landscape begins to take shape.

BRENDAN LYNCH

Brendan Lynch NY ArtistPhoto by Britt Kubat

Brendan Lynch is a conceptual artist working across media from a big studio in Red Hook, Brooklyn, that is shared with many artist friends. He and his group of young artists, many who grew up in Los Angeles as he did, form a collective called Still House and exhibit, collaborate and party together. Lynch’s work stands out as the most varied: a large black chalkboard of a panel painting reads, “I WILL NOT LOOK AT PARTY PHOTOS” written out 100 times, while a backpack filled with cement and broken glass lays next to a Carl Andre-esque floor mural made from different types of tortilla chips.

Lynch makes fun of laidback West Coast hippies and lazy conceptual artists in his work, while also treading close to those stereotypes himself. Surf wax paintings, tie-dyed paintings and sculptures, “wizard staffs” made from stacked beer cans; these things are a part of Lynch’s life but also the source of problematizing the culture he grew up in and the future of his generation’s relationship to objects.

MATTHEW STONE (U.S.)Matthew Stone NY ArtistPhoto by Britt Kubat

Matthew Stone is a sculptor recently graduated from SVA who works with various volatile elements, from spray foam to resin and pushpins to neon spandex. His first show at Like the Spice Gallery in Williamsburg, Brooklyn featured flamboyant sailboats of cardboard spray and mesh, disgorging lipsticks of polyurethane, steel and glass, and filamentous resin works called “Bonfire,” “Beacon” and “Visitor.” His works seem to open up new seams of valuable deposits, as he takes core samples from an as yet unexplored material universe. He nurtures each work like an exotic garden, letting each material bloom into a fantastic and flamboyant new form.

Having worked previously as an assistant to Marilyn Minter and Judy Pfaff, two very different and sexy female artists, Stone developed an interest in ways to make the formal fabulous. Planar cuts of foam filled wood and tenuous geometric wire forms are the beginning of the party he starts with color and texture. With wall pieces and free-standing sculptures he creates a “greenhouse” of post-apocalyptic flora and form.

ERIC YAHNKER

 

Artist Eric YahnkerPhoto by Britt Kubat

Eric Yahnker is a conceptual drawer and sculptor from Los Angeles, who studied animation at Cal Arts and journalism at USC. His enormous and detailed graphite and colored pencil drawings use a combination of artifice and versimulitude to create a poetic and perversely humorous interpretation of American culture. With what he calls a “Mel Brooks-ian take on history,” Eric delineates movie icons, art historical tableau, consumer goods and odd text-image hybrids where portraits replace letters, such as a piece that reads “A B C D E F,” followed by a little portrait of Kenny G.

A small digital clock that spells out “TITS”, Janet Jackson’s famous nip slip next to a Fragonard painting’s of the same nature, a series of drawings where a life-like male finger pokes various food items called “Fingering”; how do his various subjects relate to each other? In the words of Homer Simpson, “What is mind? No Matter. What is matter? Never mind.”

JANE MOSELEY

American Artist Jane Moseley NYCPhoto by Britt Kubat

Jane Moseley is a young artist who started out as the pioneering female in the art frat of hot dudes called Still House, young artists from Los Angeles who struck out as a team with group studios in New York City. Moseley quickly distinguished herself as one of the most meticulous and hands-on artists in a group of laissez-faire conceptual artists. Instead of just juxtaposing found objects as many of her peers did, Moseley transformed Halloween paraphernalia such as wigs and masks with an application of wax to make very intricate sculptures and paintings.

Her haunting wax visages that emerge from splattering of black or blue thrown wax harkens back to her LA upbringing with a horror movie producer for a father. She buries dolls and mannequins in washes of wig and wax, and sculpts Goya-esque slaughterhouse sculptures of wax from which an occasional butt or breast emerges. Both haunting and hokey, her works couple an exciting transformation of material with a witty, deadpan sense of humor.

ERIC YAHNKER

Eric Yahnker Artist

Eric Yahnker is a conceptual drawer and sculptor from Los Angeles, who studied animation at Cal Arts and journalism at USC. His enormous and detailed graphite and colored pencil drawings use a combination of artifice and versimulitude to create a poetic and perversely humorous interpretation of American culture. With what he calls a “Mel Brooks-ian take on history,” Eric delineates movie icons, art historical tableau, consumer goods and odd text-image hybrids where portraits replace letters, such as a piece that reads “A B C D E F,” followed by a little portrait of Kenny G.

A small digital clock that spells out “TITS”, Janet Jackson’s famous nip slip next to a Fragonard painting’s of the same nature, a series of drawings where a life-like male finger pokes various food items called “Fingering”; how do his various subjects relate to each other? In the words of Homer Simpson, “What is mind? No Matter. What is matter? Never mind.”

JANE MOSELEY

Jane MoseleyPhoto by Britt Kubat

Jane Moseley is a young artist who started out as the pioneering female in the art frat of hot dudes called Still House, young artists from Los Angeles who struck out as a team with group studios in New York City. Moseley quickly distinguished herself as one of the most meticulous and hands-on artists in a group of laissez-faire conceptual artists. Instead of just juxtaposing found objects as many of her peers did, Moseley transformed Halloween paraphernalia such as wigs and masks with an application of wax to make very intricate sculptures and paintings.

Her haunting wax visages that emerge from splattering of black or blue thrown wax harkens back to her LA upbringing with a horror movie producer for a father. She buries dolls and mannequins in washes of wig and wax, and sculpts Goya-esque slaughterhouse sculptures of wax from which an occasional butt or breast emerges. Both haunting and hokey, her works couple an exciting transformation of material with a witty, deadpan sense of humor.

text by: kathygrayson










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